I shiver, thinking how easy it is to be totally wrong about people, to see one tiny part of them and confuse it for the whole.

Lauren Oliver, Before I Fall  (2010)

(via planstobesurprised)

All literature, highbrow or low, from the Aeneid onward, is fan fiction. […] Through parody and pastiche, allusion and homage, retelling and reimagining the stories that were told before us and that we have come of age loving—amateurs—we proceed, seeking out the blank places in the map that our favorite writers, in their greatness and negligence, have left for us, hoping to pass on to our own readers—should we be lucky enough to find any—some of the pleasure that we ourselves have taken in the stuff that we love: to get in on the game. All novels are sequels; influence is bliss.

Maps and Legends: Reading and Writing Along The Borderlands, Michael Chabon. (via the-library-and-step-on-it)

Preach

(via harperperennial)

(via shinysherlock)

Parks And Recreation is criminally underrated and one of the best ensembles on TV. They figured out how to make comedy out of people who like things, as opposed to the usual sitcom where it’s just people being awful to each other. Turns out passion can heighten things in the same way that conflict does. And that delights me.

Tim Carvell, head writer for The Daily Show (Rolling Stone Sept. 2013) (via katiepoole912)

(via kenziemchale)

Does he treat you with respect at all times? That’s the first question. The second question is, if he is the exact same person twenty years from now that he is today, would you still want to marry him? And finally, does he inspire to be a better person? You find someone you can answer yes to all three, then you’ve found a good man.

Colleen Hoover (via middle-women)

(via planstobesurprised)